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Bassam Haddad and Brian Edwards Discuss Middle East Studies and Public Scholarship

[Left to right: Brian Edwards and Bassam Haddad.] [Left to right: Brian Edwards and Bassam Haddad.]

This conversation between Bassam Haddad of George Mason University and Brian Edwards of Northwestern University addresses the role of public scholarship and its relation to print publication within the climate of Middle East Studies. The discussion was held as part of the MENA Dialogues series produced by Northwestern's Middle East and North African Studies Program.

MENA Dialogues is a video series produced by the Middle East and North African Studies Program at Northwestern University and consisting of interviews with leading scholars, artists, and writers. The series is produced by Sandeep Reddy Pamulapati and Danny Postel. This interview will be featured in Status/الوضع Magazine's Spring 2017 Issue.

Brian Edwards is Crown Professor in Middle East Studies, Professor of English, Comparative Literary Studies, and American Studies, and founding Director of the MENA Program at Northwestern University.  He is the author of After the American Century: The Ends of U.S. Culture in the Middle East (Columbia, 2016; paperback 2017),  Morocco Bound: Disorienting America's Maghreb, from Casablanca to the Marrakech Express (Duke, 2005), co-editor of Globalizing American Studies (Chicago, 2010), and author of numerous essays, Op-Eds, articles and reviews in both scholarly and general interest publications. Twitter: @briantedwards

Bassam Haddad is Director of the Middle East and Islamic Studies Program and Associate Professor at the Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University. He is the author of Business Networks in Syria: The Political Economy of Authoritarian Resilience (Stanford University Press, 2011). Bassam serves as Founding Editor of the Arab Studies Journal and the Knowledge Production Project. He is co-producer/director of the award-winning documentary film, About Baghdad, and director of the series Arabs and Terrorism. Bassam is Co-Founder/Editor of Jadaliyya Ezine and Director of the  and the Executive Director of the Arab Studies Institute. He serves on the Board of the Arab Council for the Social Sciences and is Executive Producer of Status Audio Magazine.

 

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As part of the Egypt Elections Watch (EEW), Jadaliyya and Ahram Online, with the Center of Contemporary Arab Studies (Georgetown University) and the Middle East Studies Program (George Mason University) as co-sponsors, will produce articles/posts/profiles on a weekly basis, covering organizations, political parties, coalitions, relevant laws and procedures, and profiles of key individuals related to the Egyptian elections. This is in addition to news updates summarizing major developments surrounding the lead-up to the election, such as emerging or shifting alliances, new political positions, and candidacy announcements. If you have questions, comments, contributions, and/or an eye-witness account, please email us at: eew@jadaliyya.com. For a listing of EEW’s team members please click here.

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Population(July 2016 est.): 94,666,993
GDP($US trillions, 2016 est.)$1.105 
Unemployment: 13.1% (2016 est.); Youth Unemployment (ages 15-24): 34.3% (2013 est.)
Internet Users (/million, 2015)31.767 (35.9%)
Exchange Rate(2016 est.)$342.8 billion 
GDP Growth Rate(2016 est.)2.51% 
Military Expenditures(2015): 1.73% of GDP 
Health Expenditures (/GDP, 2014)5.6% 
Population Growth Rate (2016 est.):  2.51%
Age Structure (2016 est.)0-14 years: 33.21%; 15-24 years: 19.24%; 25-54 years: 37.47%; 55-64 years: 5.91%; 65 years and over: 4.17% 
Literacy (2016 est.): 73.8% 
Religious Demographics: Muslim (mostly Sunni) 90%; Coptic 9%; other Christian 1%